The Last Passenger – Book Review

Charles Lenox Mystery Book .3
By: Charles Finch
Published on: February 18, 2020

The Last Passenger is a book from one of my favorite mystery series and always one I can count on to deliver a good story and one that leaves me immediately wanting to pick up the next in the series, even if it is a re-read. The Last Passenger was no exception.

The story opens in a scene filled with humor and wit – apparently London has decided Charles needs a wife. Through-out the story we get to watch Charles skillfully evade potential future wives as they are introduced to Charles over and over again. Marriage and love in general are one of the common themes in this novel. But, this book is set in a time where a woman’s economic and financial options are limited, which is also introduced into the story. Even so, if one is lucky enough they get to experience true love, which we get to see very clearly through Lady Jane and Lord Deere’s relationship.

Toward the beginning of the story Charles becomes involved with a murder case where the clues and lack of clues are difficult to interpret, not to mention no one has any idea of who the victim is, which takes quite a bit of sleuthing to figure out. Through the course of the investigation we learn there is a connection tied to the politics of the American slave trade and as the story progresses the reader is given a little insight around the differences between the U.S. and U.K. policies and support in regards to slavery and the slave trade.

How does one not fall in love with this series? Because this is a prequel to the actual series I knew already where the story would take the characters, but even so, my heart still broke with that ending. It was so incredibly well done and so emotional. Not overly dramatic, but skillfully done with a delicate, light touch leaving my heart raw and bare.

Highly recommended to anyone who loves a traditional detective mystery story that is set in England in the mid 1800’s.

Rating: 5 stars

Thanks to Netgalley and St. Martin’s Press and Minotaur Books for the advanced reader copy and opportunity to provide an honest review.

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The Night Vanishing – Book Review

Painter Mann Series Book 2 By Dick Wybrow
Published on: January 16, 2020

Painter Mann is a dead private investigator currently residing in what he calls the “In Between” – a place where people who have been murdered go instead of going to their final destination, as you will. In fact he will tell you he is the best PI in the In Between, but because he’s the only one that also means he is the worst one too.

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Gumshoe Blues – Blog Tour – Book Review

By Paul Brazill
Published on: August 30, 2019
Blog Tour by: Blackthorn Book Tours

Written with a voice and style so strong that it was as if the narrator in my head was from a 1940’s noir film set in New York. However, it wasn’t too long before I realized the voice narrating the story in my head needed to change accents because it is actually set in Seatown, England featuring a main character who has most definitely seen better days.

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[ARC Review] Silent Night

Detective Iris Locke Book 1 by Geraldine Hogan
Published on: August 23, 2019

There’s something almost joyous about being at the start of a new detective series. The Detective Iris Lock series is just that – a new series by Geraldine Hogan set in Limerick, Ireland with new flawed characters to love, be frustrated with, and hope at the end of the day they just make it home.

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[ARC Review] Asylum – Book Review

By Jack Adams
Published on:  August 2, 2019
4-stars-1

Asylum

Set in Australia, Asylum is a mystery story involving two young friends – Adam and Nate and a man who lives at a nearby Asylum that they meet and become friends with – Joe. Years later, Adam and Nate receive an inheritance from Joe, which then leads to questions such as “What happened to Joe?” and ‘What really went on at that asylum?”

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